The Prince with Amnesia by Emily Evans

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Despite the fact that the title could be a little more alluring and that the reader has to suspend all reality for this book, (because no way is a hot, seventeen year old, European prince, second in line to his county’s throne, going to go to a public high school in Texas. That’s just stuff of fairy tales, not real life.) (Damn it!) this is a surprisingly good story. In fact, in my opinion, if it had been fleshed out a little, with more character development, more insight into the hero, Kai’s family, and had not left the reader hanging at the end, I would’ve given it 5 stars.

**Spoiler Alert**

Kind of…

The ending is not really a cliff hanger, per se, more like it just ends without any elaboration. We get the bones of the plot but not the meat. We’re given little hints about things, such as Kai’s grandmother’s involvement in the cause of his amnesia but no further explanation. There’s the whole reality show set up that we’re led to believe is to bring attention to the small country, but seems to just be an elaborate cover up for Kai’s… assassination? (It’s not spelled out but that’s what I concluded even though he’d been in Texas for most of it.) And what’s with Violet’s overbearingly strict parents not letting her date all through high school but allowing her to run all over Europe with a group of her classmates, with just her eighteen year old male cousin and one woman teacher as chaperones? See? Just not enough build up and transition from one plot point to the next.

I know it sounds like I didn’t like, The Prince with Amnesia, on the contrary, I liked it a lot. I think that’s why I’m leaving such a critical sounding review. I’ve read other books by Emily Evans and I know this one could’ve been something great.

Best wishes for great books,

Charli

The 9 Minute Thing: A Witty, Erotic Novella by Rylie May

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Wow! This should happen to every woman, at least once in her life. A smoking, hot, younger, rich guy to dominate her, give her amazing orgasms, and buy her all new, expensive clothes. Sounds great to me!

Gillian is a 39 year old, divorced, college teacher. During a student/teacher meeting, Gillian’s student, Blake, confuses and intrigues the heck out of her. She’s not sure if he’s coming on to her or just being cocky, that is, until he kisses her. From there, he pursues her until she’s doing things she’d never even imagined before. And she loves every minute of it… well, except for the surprise he stages for her but you’ll have to read the book to find out what the surprise is.

Extremely sexy, laugh-out-loud funny and very well-written, ‘The 9 Minute Thing’ is a definite must-read. My only complaint is that I wanted more!!

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The Bastard (The Baddest Boys in History #1) by Inez Kelley

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History teaches us that some men are just plain evil. Stalin, Genghis Khan, Hitler, Vlad the Impaler… All have reputations for being terribly evil by torturing and killing many, many people but to some, these men were heroes.

To his countrymen, Vlad Dracul (No ‘A’. It was later added by Bram Stoker) was a great leader who warned his enemies away by impaling their comrades and putting them on display. To this day, Romanians will tell you that he was not evil.

Most of the world knows Hitler was a sadistic psychopath who killed people simply for the color of their hair, in some cases. To the Nazi’s, Hitler was a man of vision who could take the whole world to a new level.

That said, it seems it’s all in the way you look at it, your perspective, which side you’re on, or what version of the story you’ve heard.

In Inez Kelley’s, The Bastard, the Creator of All, has declared war on evil that has lasted centuries. In present time, the remaining warriors serving on earth, are the “bravest and the best” but, according to History’s point of view, are some of the meanest, cruelest men in all of history. These men are loyal to only one, besides each other, the angel that acts as their leader, the archangel, Josiel, or Sela, as she is known, the head of the Forsaken. The Forsaken is one half of the Creator’s army. They fight the good fight, on Earth, protecting the souls of humans from eternal suffering. The other half of the Creator’s army consists of the Righteous, angel warriors who protect the Heavens, led by the archangel, Michael, himself.

In the beginning of the book, the reader has no clue as to what’s going on. All we know is that a woman is attacked by paranormal beings and is then saved by paranormal beings. There’s talk of soul dust and tattoos that become weapons and, before you know it, you’re sucked in and, as the information is given, you are more and more intrigued. Pretty soon, you wish you could read faster so you can find out all the good stuff but, you also wish the book would last forever because it’s so dang good!

This story is so engrossing and full of information that, someone looking for a light read should save this one for a later date. Once you get sucked in, there’s no getting out until the end. Your emotions will be all over the place as you read. You’ll find yourself cheering for the heroine, Lacey, when she doesn’t give up despite all odds being against her. You’ll sigh dreamily over how sweet Erik is to her and how good they are together. You’ll fall in love with the warriors, and will be delighted by their personalities and camaraderie but shocked by what you find out about them. You’ll also be happy and mad, by turns, and, not giving anything away, wonder what the heck Ms. Kelley did that for. (You’ll have to read it to find out!) It’s like an on-going roller coaster of emotion, with occasional pauses for absorbing bits of history and celestial knowledge.

The best part, besides the very satisfying ending? The warriors are all totally drool-worthy and make great romantic hero material. With, The Bastard, being the first book in the series, I can only patiently wait (NOT!) and wonder excitedly, who the next book will be about.

Goodreads

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‘Enjoying the Chase’ by Kirsty Moseley

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Click photo for Amazon link
 
 First, let me say that I love Kirsty Moseley’s stories. This is the third one I’ve read, and I’ve enjoyed them all, very much. Her characters have a lot of depth with realistic personalities and I found myself really falling in love with them. I’d even go so far as to say, that the main male character, Nate Peters, is my new favorite male character! He’s not only extremely masculine and good-looking but he’s romantic, thoughtful, affectionate, loyal, honorable and has a terrific sense of humor! I could go on but let’s just say that he’s pretty much perfect, and leave it at that. 
 
The plot kept my attention, was very believable and put me through a lot of different emotions. I found myself saying, ‘Just one more chapter’ a lot, and was a bit sad when it ended. The ending is a very satisfying, happily ever after, though, and there’s even a brief glimpse into the future, which I love! 
 
Now comes the hard part, the things I didn’t love…. 
 
It’s very apparent that Ms. Moseley doesn’t use a professional editor, if one at all. There are so many errors that I was taken out of the story several times, which I hate. I read as an escape and I don’t want to be reminded that it’s just a story by grammatical errors and misplaced words. Unfortunately, this book is riddled with them, and it’s a shame because it’s really a wonderful story. It’s also apparent that Ms. Moseley is not from the U.S., where the story takes place. This isn’t as big a problem for me as it was in the first book in this series but it can be distracting. If you can overlook the errors and misplaced words, I think you’ll truly enjoy this story.
 
I gave it 4 stars despite the errors because I enjoyed it that much. I truly hope that Kirsty Moseley finds a good editor, preferably from the USA, because she’s doing herself and her readers, a big disservice by not using one. Once she does, I think her story-telling talent will take her far as an author. I’m looking forward to reading more from her.
 
Happy Reading! 

‘Twas the Darkest Night by Sophie Avett (A Sinister Stitches spinoff)

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I received this book in exchange for an honest review through the Goodreads group, Lovers of Paranormal. When I first started reading, I thought I’d made a mistake by agreeing to read and review it. I was a little overwhelmed and didn’t think I was going to like it. That changed very quickly. Before I knew it, I was in deep. I didn’t want to put it down and found myself stealing time to read it here and there.

The writing is like poetry or the lyrics to a song. The author doesn’t just tell the reader what’s going on or what the scenery looks like, she paints you a picture with her words. It’s definitely not a book you can just walk through, you have to pay attention but, if you do, you’ll realize what a beautifully written story it is. Surprisingly, the story has a lot of Dom/Sub elements in it, that I didn’t expect. These were also written in such a way as to bring a sort of beauty to the scenes. There are occasional ‘raunchy’ words thrown into the dialogue but it’s done in a way that adds to the personality of the character speaking, and doesn’t really take away from the prose-like narrative.

The characters are multi-faceted and, though they are paranormal creatures, they have a realness to them that only enhances the story. Humans and monsters have learned to live together, for the most part, and the supernatural beings live and work just as humans do, only after dusk. You get the fantasy of a paranormal realm with a bit of reality thrown in. Not too much, just enough to give it a sense of believability, with a twist. The main heroine, Elsa, is a strong being who gives the impression that nothing can phase her but we get glimpses of her soft underbelly the minute she reveals her attraction to the main hero. She brought tears to my eyes on a few different occasions with her vulnerability. The main hero, Marshall, on the other hand, actually believes he’s a strong, cold-as-ice, hard-ass with no weaknesses. As the story unfolds, we find that he’s as layered as any other being, once you chip away at his shields.

Speaking of characters, there are so many awesomely, interesting characters in this story that anyone with a fascination for myths, legends, fairytales, and the like, will be spellbound. You’ll find a variety of beings here, from ghosts and pixies, to vampires and brownies, each with distinct personalities and quirks. It was amazing to me that I could keep them all straight but they’re so well-written and individually interesting, that I had no trouble at all.

I’m not going into detail as to spoil the ending but I just want to say that I loved that Marshall wasn’t appalled by Elsa’s ‘true form’. That part, to me, was so very beautiful and, I admit, I got a little teary-eyed. Elsa deserved to be loved completely, and so did Marshall, for that matter. Lovers of happily-ever-afters won’t be disappointed, and that’s all I’m going to say.

Happy Reading!!!

Click on the photo to see book for link to Amazon.com

Win an iPad mini from Rose Pressey in celebration of her new release, “Forever Charmed’!!

Win an iPad mini! | rosepressey.com.

This contest runs through March 30, 2013, with winners announced on March 31st! The winners will be drawn at random. Remember, the more entries you get, the more chances you have to win!!

Halloween LaVeau is descended from a long line of witches. Yes, her name is Halloween. The cosmic universe is definitely playing some kind of sick joke on her. She’s the ultimate witch cliché, complete with a black cat and spooky house. Thank heavens she’s missing the warts and flying broom.
When Halloween inherits her great-aunt’s manor, she decides to put the house to good use as a bed-and-breakfast. Her first guest is the sinfully good-looking Nicolas Marcos, but he’s not here for the continental breakfast. Halloween discovers a ratty old book in the attic. It’s written in an unfamiliar language.
Halloween soon learns this is not an ordinary spellbook. The tome brings her a new talent, but her new skills come with a catch. When a rival witch comes after the book, Halloween doesn’t know who to trust–the sexy vampire who says he wants to save the day, or the warlock who says he can destroy the book once and for all.

Charli Denae’s Reviews > ‘Feyland: The Dark Realm’ by Anthea Sharp

       Charli Denae Mercer‘s review

Sep 20, 2012
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I was sent a digital download of ‘Feyland: The Dark Realm’ by the author, Anthea Sharp, in exchange for a fair and honest review. I’d read the synopsis and thought it sounded interesting but really, hadn’t the ‘teenagers-being-sucked-into-a-computer-game’ plot been done before? What really intrigued me, though, was the mention of the computer game being ‘a gateway to the dangerous Realm of the Faerie’. I love fairy tales, especially retold tales, so I decided to go in with an open mind. I try to always be open-minded and positive about things. I don’t want to jump to conclusions or pass judgement before I truly understand what’s going on. I’ve been burned before when I’ve done that and, even though I was pretty sure I knew what to expect, I still wanted to give the book a fair try. What I really didn’t expect, was to be actually drawn into the game myself! All I can say is, ‘Wow’!
The description of Feyland and it’s characters is, in itself, a great reason to read this book. The writing is like prose only… not so much. It’s hard to explain but you actually feel the words. I mean, ‘Sparkling like moonlight on frost’… ? Yep. Can’t you picture it… almost feel the chill? Or how about, ‘It was a cobweb whisper through his mind’? I know, right? You can actually hear a faint whisper floating through your head but then, you’re not quite sure if you really heard anything, or not. The whole book is like that. It’s wonderful! Even if you don’t have a very creative imagination, you’ll find yourself being able to see every level of Feyland in your mind.The Realm character descriptions are equally as magical. You’ll find yourself gasping at how wickedly beautiful the Dark Queen is, or wrinkling your nose at how bad the goblins smell. Your heart will quicken when there’s danger and you’ll catch your breath once you’re safe. You’ll recall fairy tales you saw or read as a child in every character you meet but they’ll seem totally unique, at the same time. 

The human, or real world, is a drastic contrast in itself, as well as to Feyland. Everything is either decrepit and precarious, or impeccable and unassailable, almost like a sterile prison. In fact, the whole story seems to be a contradiction of itself as the two worlds fight against each other. As they start to bleed into one another, you begin to question where one world ends, and the other begins. 

The mortal characters are pretty cool, too. Jennet, the heroine, has an endearing vulnerability that she continually pushes through to draw on her inner strength. As she travels through Feyland, she draws on this strength, at first, to save herself but eventually, to save those she loves, as well as all of mankind. Tam, the hero, is less than poor and, at first, seems kind of cold and aloof. He assumes that Jennet is judging him and works to appear indifferent. You find out why as his home life is revealed but you wonder how he’ll be able to help her with so much already on his plate. It’s soon apparent that there’s much more to Tam than you first assume. He’s a champion ‘Simmer’ (simulation computer game player), very responsible, and loyal to the bone. I’m convinced he’s among the very best Young Adult heroes out there.

The secondary characters aren’t described in much detail but, miraculously, you tend to get a pretty good picture of them through various situations and conversations. Some are detrimental to the plot, and some are just there to move the story along but the author gives you the sense that all of the characters are just as important as any of the others. There’s a definite ending to the story but, at the same time, there’s hope that the story will continue because it’s just that good. These briefly mentioned characters could very well play a larger role in Tam and Jennet’s future but, if they don’t, you feel as though you got to know them anyway.

I really, really enjoyed this book. This is one of those books where the words just flow so smoothly that you lose track of time. It’s almost like you’re actually lost in the play of a game and can’t believe what time it is when you finally look up. Books like that don’t come along all that often but when they do, you almost mourn them when you’re through. You miss the characters and actually yearn to read it again just so you can reconnect with them. Give this series a try, I’m convinced you won’t be sorry. You may even share a love/hate relationship with me once you’re done, sad that it’s already over.

Goodreads | Charli Denae Mercer’s review of Feyland: The Dark Realm

(The 2nd book in the Trilogy, ‘Feyland: The Bright Court’, is out now, with the 3rd to be released this fall, 2012.)